Sound System Design Essentials Morecambe

Most audio pros in Morecambe know that loudspeaker data can be used to predict important aspects of a sound system's performance at the drawing board stage of a project. But it's also possible to extend the concept to array design.

Aerial Aid
01524 411114
Whetherlea
Morecambe
 
Gordon Wooff Kitchens
01229 584447
Sunny Brae
Ulverston
 
Rob Lumb
01229 471143
19 Biggar Village
Barrow in Furness
 
M L S Gomersall
01229 433088
16 St Lukes Avenue
Barrow in Furness
 
Rons T V Aerials.
01229 825926
55 Cameron Street
Barrow in Furness
 
A R D
01539 532792
Dun Hoy
Grange Over Sands
 
Nathan Green
01229 473648
14 Lord Roberts Street
Barrow in Furness
 
Aerialsat Ltd
01229 467633
19 Butts Beck
Dalton in Furness
 
P. R. M
01229 812890
30 Laurence Avenue
Barrow in Furness
 
Skytech
01229 822820
Abbey Rd
Barrow in Furness
 

Sound System Design Essentials

Provided By:

Source: PRO AV Magazine
Publication date: July 1, 2007

By Pat Brown

Most audio pros know that loudspeaker data can be used to predict important aspects of a sound system's performance at the drawing board stage of a project. But it's also possible to extend the concept to array design.

The array prediction process is embraced by some, shunned by others, and amazingly accurate when done within the limitations of data and prediction methods.

We need arrays because many venues cannot be covered adequately with a single loudspeaker. Yet implementing multiple loudspeakers can introduce a lot of problems. Ask any RF engineer what happens when you radiate radio waves into a space from two different antennas operating on the same frequency. His likely answer: “Drop outs. Don't do it.”

The same principles apply to loudspeaker arrays. When multiple antennas are used, either they are located in very close proximity to create a desired radiation pattern (such as the log periodic dipole often used with wireless mics) or they are spread out with minimum overlap to cover a large area (such as cell phone towers).

Loudspeaker arrays are like the first example. This seems easy until you consider that the ideal loudspeaker array must have the same radiation pattern for over 8 octaves, not at a single frequency.

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