Flashing at Sills Kirkby Stephen

Sill flashing controls water that penetrates through the masonry sill and helps control water penetrating the perimeter sealant joint around the windows. The sill flashing will prevent water from saturating the top of the masonry beneath the sill. Read on to learn more about flashing information in Kirkby Stephen.

E M Treece
01768 371221
42 South Road
Kirkby Stephen
 
Barker G A & J
01768 341207
Dyke Nook
Appleby in Westmorland
 
Bainbridge K
01768 351291
Midtown Farm
Appleby in Westmorland
 
P Mawdsley
01768 353171
13 Drawbriggs Court
Appleby in Westmorland
 
J W R Allen
01768 361320
Oakbank
Appleby in Westmorland
 
J M Smith Building Construction
01768 341230
Brow House
Kirkby Stephen
 
Metcalfe P
01768 352745
Mid Town Cottage
Appleby in Westmorland
 
W A Developments Ltd
01768 353333
Station Road
Appleby in Westmorland
 
D Jackson Construction
01768 351840
16 Glebe Crescent
Appleby in Westmorland
 
Charles Booth
01768 351678
Mews House
Appleby in Westmorland
 

Flashing at Sills

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Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: July 1, 2000

Why do people install flashings beneath masonry sills? Are they required if a single-piece stone sill is used?

Sill flashing controls water that penetrates through the masonry sill and helps control water penetrating the perimeter sealant joint around the windows. The sill flashing will prevent water from saturating the top of the masonry beneath the sill. These flashings are especially important when using rowlock brick sills or other sills that have many joints. Multiple joints increase the risk of developing excessive water penetration into the masonry below.

In hot humid climates, sill flashings may also be helpful in preventing hot humid cavity air from condensing on the underside and perimeter of the window. In this case, the sill flashings should be integrated with a cavity seal at the window head and jambs.

When using a single-piece stone or precast concrete at a window, the flashing is less important. Very little water will penetrate a single-piece stone or concrete sill. Flashings, however, are still useful in controlling water penetration at perimeter sealant joints or preventing hot humid cavity air from reaching the perimeter of the window. Where flashing is not used, the stone or precast concrete sill should project beyond the face of the masonry and contain a drip. This will prevent water penetration at the joint beneath the sill.

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