Flashing at Sills Broughton-in-Furness

Sill flashing controls water that penetrates through the masonry sill and helps control water penetrating the perimeter sealant joint around the windows. The sill flashing will prevent water from saturating the top of the masonry beneath the sill. Read on to learn more about flashing information in Broughton-in-Furness.

Cl & Lj Garnett
01229 716119
1 Fellview Barn
Broughton in Furness
 
Chris Hull Construction Ltd
01229 716821
Orchard Barn
Broughton in Furness
 
Chris Hull Construction Ltd
01229 716821
2 New Street
Broughton in Furness
 
Ausobsky D
01229 774257
High Brow Farm
Millom
 
Paver Print
01229 885006
Carp Lodge
Ulverston
 
Eric Ashcroft
01229 716540
The Ghyll
Broughton in Furness
 
David Webb Building
01229 775431
The Hollow
Millom
 
Watson Bros
01229 716565
Tree Tops
Millom
 
South Lakeland Bricklayers LTD
01229 889921
Dunnerdale,Sandside
Cumbria
 
Dugdale Allan
01539 441162
Browside
Coniston
 

Flashing at Sills

Provided By:

Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: July 1, 2000

Why do people install flashings beneath masonry sills? Are they required if a single-piece stone sill is used?

Sill flashing controls water that penetrates through the masonry sill and helps control water penetrating the perimeter sealant joint around the windows. The sill flashing will prevent water from saturating the top of the masonry beneath the sill. These flashings are especially important when using rowlock brick sills or other sills that have many joints. Multiple joints increase the risk of developing excessive water penetration into the masonry below.

In hot humid climates, sill flashings may also be helpful in preventing hot humid cavity air from condensing on the underside and perimeter of the window. In this case, the sill flashings should be integrated with a cavity seal at the window head and jambs.

When using a single-piece stone or precast concrete at a window, the flashing is less important. Very little water will penetrate a single-piece stone or concrete sill. Flashings, however, are still useful in controlling water penetration at perimeter sealant joints or preventing hot humid cavity air from reaching the perimeter of the window. Where flashing is not used, the stone or precast concrete sill should project beyond the face of the masonry and contain a drip. This will prevent water penetration at the joint beneath the sill.

Click here to read full article from Masonry Construction