Flashing at Sills Barrow-in-Furness

Sill flashing controls water that penetrates through the masonry sill and helps control water penetrating the perimeter sealant joint around the windows. The sill flashing will prevent water from saturating the top of the masonry beneath the sill. Read on to learn more about flashing information in Barrow-in-Furness.

Michael Crowe Building & Construction
01229 433783
15 Marsh Street
Barrow in Furness
 
Handyman
01229 470035
10 Leopard Street
Barrow in Furness
 
Owen Williamson
01229 877532
25 Priors Path
Barrow in Furness
 
Design Crete
01229 822396
12 Longmynd Avenue
Barrow in Furness
 
Brian Mawson & Son
01229 870522
Bouthwood Rd
Barrow in Furness
 
A Plant Hire Co
01229 870500
Ironworks Road
Barrow in Furness
 
K C Building Contractors
01229 839026
4 Gainsbourgh Place
Barrow in Furness
 
George Miles
01229 828301
90 Crellin St
Barrow in Furness
 
H Mccartan & Son
01229 833642
4 Hawcoat Lane
Barrow in Furness
 
G M B Builders
01229 820007
17 Hartington Street
Barrow in Furness
 

Flashing at Sills

Provided By:

Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: July 1, 2000

Why do people install flashings beneath masonry sills? Are they required if a single-piece stone sill is used?

Sill flashing controls water that penetrates through the masonry sill and helps control water penetrating the perimeter sealant joint around the windows. The sill flashing will prevent water from saturating the top of the masonry beneath the sill. These flashings are especially important when using rowlock brick sills or other sills that have many joints. Multiple joints increase the risk of developing excessive water penetration into the masonry below.

In hot humid climates, sill flashings may also be helpful in preventing hot humid cavity air from condensing on the underside and perimeter of the window. In this case, the sill flashings should be integrated with a cavity seal at the window head and jambs.

When using a single-piece stone or precast concrete at a window, the flashing is less important. Very little water will penetrate a single-piece stone or concrete sill. Flashings, however, are still useful in controlling water penetration at perimeter sealant joints or preventing hot humid cavity air from reaching the perimeter of the window. Where flashing is not used, the stone or precast concrete sill should project beyond the face of the masonry and contain a drip. This will prevent water penetration at the joint beneath the sill.

Click here to read full article from Masonry Construction