Fallen Arches Barrow-in-Furness

Some residential designers and builders in Barrow-in-Furness have failed to recognize that all brick arches are structural masonry and must be designed according to structural principals.

T.p Mcnulty Construction Ltd
01229 832386
19 The Crescent
Barrow in Furness
 
Peter Daw
01229 823442
10 Whinlatter Drive
Barrow in Furness
 
George Miles
01229 828301
90 Crellin St
Barrow in Furness
 
H Mccartan & Son
01229 833642
4 Hawcoat Lane
Barrow in Furness
 
Owen Williamson
01229 877532
25 Priors Path
Barrow in Furness
 
Lavender & Wood
01229 823385
60 Schneider Road
Barrow in Furness
 
Michael Crowe Building & Construction
01229 433783
15 Marsh Street
Barrow in Furness
 
Brian Mawson
01229 820479
Bouthwood Road
Barrow in Furness
 
K C Building Contractors
01229 839026
4 Gainsbourgh Place
Barrow in Furness
 
Allied Claims Ltd
01229 470025
21 The Promenade
Barrow in Furness
 

Fallen Arches

Provided By:

Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: October 1, 1995

By William G. Bailey

Abstract:

Some residential designers and builders have failed to recognize that all brick arches are structural masonry and must be designed according to structural principals.

Arch Types and Terms
The types of arches most commonly used in residential construction are: jack, segmental, semicircular, and parabolic. Arches typically are classified as "minor" or "major." Minor arches are used to span openings of up to 6 feet and support vertical loads of less than 1,000 pounds per lineal foot. Major arches are those that span more than 6 feet and can support vertical loads greater than 1,000 pounds per lineal foot.

Thrust Loads
Although they carry loads in compression, masonry arches impart horizontal thrust loads at each end or "skewback." The abutments at each side of an arch must be strong enough to resist these loads. Most problems occur in arches that frame into columns. In residential construction arches frame into a column that often consists of a 4x4-inch wood member. Brick are laid merely to enclose the wood column. Such hollow brick columns offer little or no resistance to thrust loads. Various methods can be used to resist thrust loads. When feasible, avoid framing arches into columns and instead place arched openings in walls. Alternatively, increase the strength of columns by increasing their cross section and adding reinforcing steel and grout.

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